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Melbourne Archives - The X Gene

Fanny Bullock Workman with her explorer gear, ropes, and face that means business

Go Out Of Your Way

By | Producing, Purpose | No Comments

Our producer Simon J Green talks about going out of your way to find more women.

If you’re a man, you’ve got some options. The history of cultures and societies, spanning centuries, has put men on top. We ruled over vast monuments in ancient Egypt, we covered the earth in global war, and we went to the moon and stars. That whole time, we were absolute pricks to women, keeping them down with every dirty trick we could invent. Now, finally, in the least 50 years, we’ve been trying to see humanity as a whole, not as two sexes.

With all these impressive feats of humanity, you’d think going out of our way to bring about equality would be easy. Certainly down at the pathetic level of being an artist or screen practitioner in Australia, the stakes are so low, the rewards so paltry, the barrier to equality should be thinner than a male artist’s skin.

When you’re a producer or director, you have a contact list with names you regularly draw on to help you create. Favourites and preferences. I have such a list, organised into at least 5 of each category of skill I need. My 5 editors, graphic designers,  web developers, directors, motion graphics artists, soundies, camera operators. Each of them has been tested on a job first, proved to be reliable, professional and talented before being added to my list.

When a job comes up and I need to send a quote or ask a question, I consult my lists. Each person has strengths and styles that exclude them from some jobs or make them prime candidates for others.

I started these lists years ago, and one day when I looked at them, I realised they were mostly men. About 90% of the names were dudes. I’ve written before about my failure to include women on the front page of my company website. In this list was the proof men were being chosen over women, because women weren’t even in my default consideration. I sucked.

So, I went out of my way to change it. I sought out women who were talented, reliable and professional in each of the categories. The men weren’t removed—the only time anyone is removed from my lists is if they’ve changed careers or states—but instead, my lists swelled to much more useful and flexible sizes.

Doing this gave me better access to more talent, better suited teams for individual jobs, and led to some of the best freelancer relationships I’ve ever had. I’ve also gotten jobs because of my diverse crew. All because I went a tiny little bit out of my way to equalise my lists. The culmination of that effort came in the stellar reviews we got for Night Terrors, a production that had ten women and two men. 83% women.

It also helped me see which parts of the screen and design industries are garbage at bringing up women. I’m still short on ladies who love:

  • Motion graphics
  • Camera operating
  • Directing
  • Editing
  • Gaffing
  • Sound

Feel free to reach out if you are someone who does these things. I don’t do as much video work any more, but I recommend my list to other producers and directors a bunch.

Thing is, men, go out of your way. A tiny little bit. Look at your list, your group, the people you draw on the most. Do they all have penises? Then go out of your way to find women with the same set of skills and traits. They OF COURSE are out there, you just haven’t bothered to look. And if you say you have but couldn’t find any, then you didn’t look hard enough and gave up too quickly. In fact, I have a bunch for you right now.

We ruled over the pyramids, started world wars and walked on the moon. By comparison, equality in Australian arts should be easy. One thing men can do is go out of their way.

Electric eye looking to the future

Statement of Intent 2018+

By | Strategy, Theatre | No Comments
Simon J Green’s
Statement of Intent For
The X Gene Pty Ltd

I WANT:

I want to write original plays, and produce fun theatre for my company, The X Gene.

I want to make The X Gene a theatre company that can tell my stories, and that economically and creatively supports a group of makers I respect and trust.

I want the stories we tell to be fun and fantastic, using genre (sci-fi, horror, fantasy, adventure, etc) to explore and blow up our social fears.

I want structural narrative to dominate the development process, so that all of our choices come back to the story and its why/purpose. I think Aaron Sorkin, Ann Patchett and David Mamet do this well.

I want the company and the productions to develop us as professionals, while also providing a platform for bringing up underrepresented groups in theatre (women, people with disability, people of colour).

I want the audience to enjoy the escapism, the colour, the sounds and sights, while still appreciating the underlying social messages. I think Pixar, Tina Fey, Mike Schur and the Shaun of the Dead team are role models for this style of storytelling.

I NEED:

I need to find the right distribution pathway and income streams that can be repeated year on year, to allow stability, forward planning and growth for the theatre business.

I need my team of makers to join me in a contract capacity, so we can come together on productions and develop then execute them in a way that makes a stable profit and also gives all of us the creative satisfaction and fun we crave.

I think I need a partner or close collaborator who can autonomously and proactively generate income or opportunities for the company. Someone who understands and wants to grow the business of theatre with me.

I need to confirm that Night Terrors and regional Victoria can provide the distribution pathway and income stream I’m seeking, as a foundation for the business and all future productions and plans.

I THINK:

I think that we should develop some sort of social program to attach to our productions, because they broaden the appeal of the show as a package, widen income opportunities and the cultural relevance of our work. They also help us pursue our individual social consciences, and the social mission of the business: to represent the underrepresented.

I think that Night Terrors can be a regular yearly production that pairs a director and a performer, and draws from the established library of out of copyright horror stories we’ve adapted for stage. I think it can be cheap, easy to tour, and can run for approximately two years before the incarnation runs out of steam.

I think that Night Terrors can be a training ground for new talent, that can be inducted into our approach to teamwork and production, hardened on the road, and then elevated into the original productions we develop.

I think something like a repertory model could work for us. Night Terrors and even BULLET can be toured around, and new work, first the stories I want to tell, but eventually other written pieces by our team, can be developed, premiered at Melbourne Fringe, and then added to our repertoire and sold to our distro pathway.

I think Australian Fringe Festivals and regional/rural Victoria are the best places to start in developing the relationships we need for our distribution pathway and income streams.

I think that until we can prove otherwise, I and the team will need to maintain part-time or casual jobs elsewhere, to allow us the money and stability to engage in The X Gene productions on a project by project basis.

Night Terrors Skull header image from unsplash-Photo by Mathew MacQuarrie

SEEKING: Front of House

By | Events, Theatre | No Comments

Front of House volunteers for Melbourne Fringe theatre show Night Terrors.

If you are starting out or emerging in theatre or the arts, this is a great role. Each show night, the front of house volunteer will assist the producer in taking tickets, showing people to their seats, and helping any stragglers who arrive once the show has begun. You are crucial in providing the right experience and setting a professional tone. You’ll also get to see the show for free each night, a free ticket for a friend.

We will need one front of house volunteer each performance, over over 14 nights in 14-30 Sept 2018. You can put your hand up for as many of those 14 nights as you like, though preference will be given to those who can do more.

Venue: Bluestone Church Arts Space, 8A Hyde Street, Footscray VIC
Dates and Time: Sept 14-16, 20, 21, 23, 25-30. Thu-Sat 9pm. Tue, Wed, Sun 7pm.

You will need
– Transport to and from our venue (either Club Voltaire, North Melbourne or Bluestone Church Arts Space, Footscray)
– Good English skills to read ticket details, listen to and answer questions.
– Reliable and professional personality, as our audience and their experience is one of the most important aspects of the show.
– Commitment. Once you say yes, we’ll be relying on you as part of our team, to make sure the show can run smoothly.

We will interview each applicant on the phone and then meet in person. Even though this is a volunteer role, we are big believers in value exchange. If we meet you in person, we will learn about what you want to get out of theatre and the arts, and should you join the team, we’ll find ways to give you some sort of value in exchange, be that specific experience, services or support.

Please send an email to simon@thexgene.com and provide:
– A CV or some other way of demonstrating your experience so far.
– Why you want to volunteer for this role.
– Your full name and phone number.

Lots of crew faces with 'YOU?' over their eyes

Co-create stories with us!

By | Design, Narrative, Research | No Comments

We want you to sign up for our co-creation workshops, so you can help us make dangerously fun stories you’ll love. We’re pioneering a new technique in making theatre, film and virtual reality. We call it audience-centred storytelling, and it’s all about getting our audience in before a word is written, and testing our ideas with you. Ultimately, we want to create stories you’ll love, and the easiest way to do it is to ask! http://eepurl.com/lF2O9

The usual way to make a piece of art is to have an idea, and then use a huge amount of physical and emotional effort to make it. Then, once it’s finished, hope the world wants to see it. Most of the time, sadly, the world is a cruel butthead and does not want to see it. So we took the big fat brains of smarter people in the worlds of human-centred design, lean, agile and design thinking, smooshed their techniques together and created audience-centred storytelling.

We have an idea, and we take it to a diverse group of people who will ultimately be our audience. We show you our idea in its embryonic form, and seek your feedback. At the same time we find out what you, our audience wants, likes, needs from entertainment. We use that feedback to reiterate or redraft our idea in its simplest form. Rinse and repeat until we’ve developed a concept we know you like and will watch. We continue to advance the concept stage by stage with our audience until it’s released.

Why go to the ridiculous amount of effort making movies, theatre and virtual reality unless we know you wanna see ’em? So, let’s find out what you think is dangerously fun. Sign up to our list: we only ever use it to offer opportunities to co-create with us.

If you have any questions, ask Simon J Green via simon@thexgene.com or Messenger (voice messages welcome!)

THE X GENE CO-DESIGN SIGNUP

* indicates required



I want to co-create:

A demo of Tilt Brush, bright colours

We Went To The FilmVic VR Industry Day

By | Innovation, VR | No Comments

We got to participate in Film Victoria and ACMI’s free VR Lab as part of the VR Industry Day, November 2016. Producer Simon J Green was a successful VR Lab participant and, thanks to those kind organisers, had the opportunity to develop our VR concept with a range of experienced VR content creators from VRTOV, Sandpit, StartVR, Grumpy Sailor, Visual Playground and PLaTO Reality. Here he is, letting you know what it was like.

First I wandered around the playground of VR experiences and demos, trying some I’d done before like the excellent NYTs solitary confinement piece, and new fun like the carnival games in Vive that were just good old fashioned, Wii style fun.

Finally got to try Collisions, the first VR film with stories from Aboriginal Australians. The possibilities of such incredible spaces and people were under-utilised, but the highlights were the drone shots as Nyarri Morgan used his fire craft to light the scrub and the central element of the nuke going off as Nyarri told his story. His story was the best part, and I’d have loved to see more focus expanding his story into a visual, 360 medium. Awesome to see it all coming together and paired with ILM.

The session with the other creators was the best bit. Everyone, even the mentors, acknowledged we were all so new and fresh in this, so everyone was learning from everyone else. Still, we got great tips on the little things you can only discover through practical creation. And then I met three groups of people I’m now collaborating with.The workshop was an excellent leveller. There were older, more experienced traditional filmmakers in the room who, frankly, have not been the most open and willing in other settings, but who in this space could only be at the same level as the rest of us. It broke down some very tired, rather useless hierarchies, allowing us to all connect as creatives.

Something I took away was feeling that my team are making great progress in the business and distribution side of the industry, which is giving me so much confidence going forward as we turn The X Gene into a dedicated VR company. That came from, again, openness and a willingness to share both the ups and downs of our experience. As a result, those who saw my strengths, I could see strength in, and we came together to work on stuff after the lab.

I could feel our relative beginner nature, but in this context it was completely appropriate and appreciated, because we’re all starting out. What I loved was the openness. Our industry, I’ve found, keeps their doors closed, but with newer generations of makers and technology, those barriers are breaking down. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I was delighted with the people I met, both the other participants and the mentors.

Enormous thanks to FilmVic and ACMI, and all the mentors and companies who gave their time, gear and expertise to the days. We’re creating a new medium with people around the world, and finally, Australia is participating on a relatively equal footing. For now, enjoy an egalitarian medium.

CBS Twitter Freewheel Weather CHannel logos

CBS, Twitter, Weather Channel and FreeWheel Talk Video Content

By | Advertising, Research, Technology, Video, Video Blogs | No Comments

From Brightcove:

Recently, we brought together several of our media customers and partners for an excellent networking breakfast in New York City that included a panel discussion on how to maximize the performance of video content, as well as a session of case study-driven best practices shared by Brightcove’s CTO for Media, Albert Lai.

On the panel, CBS, Twitter, The Weather Channel and FreeWheel weighed in on opportunities for broadcasters in the year ahead, as well as how to measure the performance of video initiatives as it relates to advertising, user experience, reach and engagement across devices. Their thoughts seemed to resonate with many Brightcove customers in the room, some of whom contributed their own 2014 areas of focus in the video below after the sessions.

Lancers charging

How a FREELANCER Can Get Work with The X Gene

By | Freelancer, Innovation, Video | One Comment

If you’re a freelancer in the film, TV and video industry, you may have come here via this blog post, FREELANCER TIPS: Advice To Camera Operators. We get a lot of emails enquiring about whether we have room for full time or part time employees. We also gets lots of enquiries from freelancers. Very glad to help where we can, and we add your details to our files because we’re always looking for new talent. We love talking to you and sending you in the right direction, and are delighted with the popularity of our blog posts in your direction. The X Gene hates closed, locked doors.

We all have a lot of hassles finding work in the business. Going full time freelance is daunting enough, but once you take that leap, you’re now committed to finding enough work every week to keep you eating. All the folks at The X Gene have gone through this stage. Simon was a soundie and editor, Britta worked her way through film studios as an editor and Adam’s been camera opping for years. So we feel your pain.

One way we help out freelancers as well as get jobs is by being happy to help out in the parts you don’t like. Being a producer really means doing the boring and painful stuff; client liaison, sales, budgeting, invoicing, chasing and organising. Luckily, we love that stuff. There’s nothing more satisfying than being told our brief to a camera operator or editor was impeccable, or our shoot schedule meant “shit just got done.” So that’s what we can offer to the freelancer who has work but as part of a much bigger job.

Here’s how it unfolds: you get an edit job or a camera job or a graphics job, but it’s part of a much larger project, and you don’t want all that nonsense. You just wanna do your thing. Bring the job to us, and tell us what you want to do and how much you want to get paid for it. We prepare the quote, pitch or proposal and get your approval. We take it to the client, with your role securely in place within the project. They say yes, we make it happen, you fill in your end and get paid through us.

We’ve got this set up with a few of the operators in Kindred Studio with us, and the friends and associates of other freelancers. If it’s something you’re interested in, to expand what you can offer potential clients, or if you already have a job you want to fill out, let us know.

Feature for blog about how much web video costs

How Much Does A Web Video Cost?

By | Marketing, Video | No Comments


Lots of people are curious about the price of video. It’s dependent on what you’re after, but here’s a handy guide to get you started.

The average web video is 1 to 3 minutes long. There’s juicy research from video hosting platforms that says a viewer will drop off at about 90 seconds in, so get your key messages in early.

Most of our clients use a web video to introduce a brand, service or product. They’ll deploy those videos on their site and throughout their social media network.

A commercial might be expensive, but web video is the entry point for small business. The Interactive Advertising Bureau releases reports about the digital space, and they say the stickiest sites are always those with video. That means people not only stay on the site longer, but are more likely to come back.

A ‘web video’ is a very broad category. They’re very different from video to video. To find out what’s right for someone, we start with a simple chat. We ask questions to know the brand, then understand the message. Finally, we go back and brainstorm three or four fun ideas, with budgets attached. Those concepts might be live action or animation.

Once confirmed, we take care of pre-production (concepts, scripts, storyboards, shotlists, schedules), production (cameras, lighting, cast, crew and locations) and post-production (editing, motion graphics, effects, colour grading, exporting, sound). Once it’s done, we help implement and deploy the video. This means we might work with a client’s web developer, or create different versions for different uses like online, trade shows or DVD.

The question on everybody’s lips: how much does it cost. You’re looking at $3,000 to $8,000 depending on how fancy you want to get. AU$5,000 is the average.

Honestly, the business that can afford The X Gene’s work in this area is a medium businesses with 10+ employees or an operating budget that can justify a more sophisticated marketing approach. We find that’s professional firms like financial managers, insurance brokers, and the technology sector. Animated videos tend to be the realm of government, not-for-profit and education institutions, often with dry or complex messages that need to be made more visually interesting.

So that’s a quick overview of web video. Wanna make one? It’s the next step in being rad.

A golden Mercedes Benz

Why Go Pro Video: The Reason it Costs What it Costs

By | Marketing, Technology, Video | No Comments

Here’s the thing about video – anyone can do it…but only professionals can do it well.

I’d be a moron to dismiss or ignore that as digital swept through and technology got cheaper, making videos became more accessible. A smart phone today will shoot some pretty nice footage (I like how the iPhones oversaturate). This all means businesses promoting themselves can have the same sort of fun with video that we have every day.

My job as a producer at a Melbourne video agency is to make content that promotes businesses, not-for-profits, individuals – anyone with a message. The challenge is finding a place for ourselves now that anyone can afford the basic tech.

Some companies have decided to go for bulk. Buy or build a studio (because that’s something harder to get) and pump out a huge volume of video content at a cut-throat rate. It works for these companies, but they’ll freely admit they are missing one thing: quality.

The X Gene has gone a different route. We’ve moved away from cheap. We come in when our client wants a premium product. A potentially lucrative contract with a big international firm? A line of clientele that take part in the finer things in life? A large audience, a large investment, high stakes? These are the types of things a little clip in a poorly green screened studio won’t help.

If you want big returns, you need high quality. That’s The X Gene. High-end cameras, complex lighting and audio setups, multiple edit suites and specialised post-production software – yes, we have all of that, but we also have something far superior: the years of experience and proven talent to utilise all this creatively. We create the best videos we can, and then push ourselves to do better.

That’s what you’re paying for when you get a video made with us. That’s why it costs more than the quick and dirty alternatives, or the overseas options from sites like freelancer.com. I’ve heard business owners in seminars talk about getting a video done overseas and not being happy with the result. They end up making three or four mediocre videos that probably cost them more than they budgeted for anyway. I’ve also been proud to see other owners and our clients show off a premium video and say it was a bit more expensive, but the results speak for themselves.

The old cliche is true; you get what you pay for. With all this talk in the news of Australia needing to accept it can’t compete on price when working against nations four to ten times cheaper, I hear a constant refrain, “IP and value added skills and expertise are the way forward.” That’s us. Quality in a service industry, making excellent content to make you cut through and stand out. That’s why you go pro video – to be better than your competitors. We strive to be better than our competitors, so who better to team up with to take over the world?

Data on how audiences react to video content

DIY + Professionally Produced = More Sales, More Happiness

By | Advertising, Research, Technology, Video | No Comments

Sales and happiness aren’t necessarily one in the same, and conversion is the preferred industry term, but isn’t happiness better than sales or converting? Yeah, agreed.

At The X Gene, we produce videos to make people happy, but ultimately to get our clients sales, conversions or just getting a thumbs up. We’re completely aware that with technology advancing and prices for that tech falling, folks can make videos at home or in the office. Obviously, we’re really good at it and would prefer to do it for you, but ignoring the growing trend of DIY would be insane. Our producers actually come out and consult with companies around Melbourne, giving them hints or showing them even more cool stuff out there.

It turns out, when you combine us with you, the results are even more impressive than just DIY or pro video production on their own. That’s marriage, baby, and it’s happy.

This study by comScore and EXPO found that offering viewers and potential customers both a user-generated video along with a professionally produced how-to video, the sales, conversions and happiness increased way more than just one or the other, alone.

So, chat with us to combine your DNA with ours, and we’ll make a beautiful conversion sales happiness baby.

LINK: comScore Study Finds Professionally-Produced Video Content And User-Generated Product Videos Exhibit Strong Synergy in Driving Sales Effectiveness

Use video for magazines

Got A Brand, Magazine or Website? Produce TV!

By | Video | No Comments

After finishing up on 4WD Touring Australia, a 13-part half hour series airing on Aurora, Foxtel’s open channel, we want to make use of our fabulous production team to develop more series with you.

In particular, we’re after brand funded content. This can be media that has an existing advertiser base (magazines, websites, eBooks) or a product that ties in with something that people enjoy as part of their lifestyle.

For example, 4WD Touring Australia was first a magazine, but the owners turned it into a TV series that their existing advertisers took part in funding. The idea is to create a program people enjoy, while also giving them access to the elements of that lifestyle they’d be keen to buy or make use of anyway.

Our skill is in working with you to create a concept that incorporates your brand personality, and then planning, shooting, editing and generally executing the show. Aurora is the channel that airs the content around the nation, and they loved our work last time, keen to work with us again.

That’s as simple as we can put it, really! Please get in contact with us if you think you have an idea.

 

While we’re at it, here’s a great article about brand funded content from Mumbrella.

Adam Bennett camera operator with kit

FREELANCER TIPS: Advice to Camera Operators

By | Freelancer, Video | No Comments

Hello. I’m a producer. I work with talented, reliable video production crew. Part of my job is to look for freelancers I haven’t worked with before, test them with small, paid jobs, and then zealously hire them as my crew for as many productions as I can. Once I’ve found a good egg, I’ll happily pass their details to other producers I work with, because having a good crew is wasted if I can’t be a reliable source for the industry.

As such, I have a good idea of what is required of a freelance camera operator. I’m often asked for advice by guys and gals just starting out, or at a turning point in their careers. I’d like to share some of it with you. I hope it helps.

Get Your Showreel Cut and Get It Out There

This is number one. You’ll come up with a million excuses not to: the shots aren’t good enough, you need to transfer footage off other drives, you need to conform the media, you’re waiting for the director to give you the DVD. None of these reasons are good enough. Put together what you have and get it out NOW! You can update it later, but right now, you’re far less impressive without a reel.

We need it to see what you can do, and even a weak reel is better than no reel at all. I’ve looked at reels that were obviously just the two short films the student did at school – but the camera work showed promise. Without seeing the actual work you do, I have no way of judging where you are in your skill set. Once I’ve seen your reel, a chat will clear up all the other stuff. Your work is most important. Cut it and get it out there!

Spread it Around, You Nasty Thing

You have to promote yourself. That’s probably the hardest thing for you. You’re behind the camera. You like playing with lights and codecs and lenses. You’re Australian. You don’t like big-noting yourself. I get that, but here’s the thing: if I’m in a room with two camera operators, and I need them immediately to shoot something just outside, the one who tells me, “I’m really good,” will get the job, while the one who shuffles his feet stays behind.

It’s the same with the Internet. When producers, directors or agencies are on the prowl, they’ll go through a hot mess of reels and websites. The ones that stand out as being confident tell us that there must be talent behind that confidence. If it’s hollow bravado, that’ll be worked out very quickly anyway.

You might be worried that you’re good, but not good enough. That’s fine too, because if you’re a solid operator put out of your depth, you’ll come out better in the end. So put your damn hand up and say, “I’m a good camera operator.” Own it!

Specialise

There’s nothing less convincing than a business card that reads

Leslie Dixon
DOP, Editor, Director, Lighting, Motion Graphics, Plumber

I’m going to cut to the chase and use a cliche: jack of all trades, master of none. I’m looking for a camera operator to shoot an ad or a TV show or a corporate event. I try to work with the best, so I can provide my clients with the best. The best work gets the best pay. So I need to know you are focused only on cameras. You read about them when you’re on the train. You’re working towards an ACS. You can bamboozle me with the latest camera advances and chip sizes. You specialise in camera operating. One day I won’t be able to afford you because you’re so specialised in camera operating, you’re known as one of the best.

We all start off wearing multiple hats. I did, but at some point, you have to decide to specialise. It might seem wise to offer me both cam op and editor in the same package. Nope. If I want an editor, I’ll go find an editor who specialises in editing, because that person’s going to be better at it than you. Because you’re a camera operator.

Charge Appropriately and Objectively

When you’re about to send a producer your biggest quote to date, you feel nervous. They’re going to reject it! It’s too much! So you change it, reduce costs, take the hit on gear, or work half a day for free.

You dummy!

What to charge can be tough, but there’s a basic rule I learnt from a ring-in teacher when I was at RMIT. Think about your cost of living. Do a rough calculation of your rent, groceries, bills, all your regular expenses for a year. Now, think about how much money you’d reasonably like for fun each week. Add that to your yearly total. Now add 9% (12% now) for superannuation. What do you have? OK, that’s your ideal yearly wage.

Now say you were working four days a week as a camera operator. That’s 208 days. Divide your ideal yearly wage by 208. That’s what you should be earning.

It’s a good start, but I would mix that with research. Look up other camera operator rates online, or ask producer friends how much other operators are charging, roughly (no names!). Now, be as objective about your skill level as you can be and see how you stack up. Note: generally, most people think they’re worse than they really are.

Charge a daily rate and maybe a half day rate for you. Don’t charge half day rates for your gear – once it’s out, it’s out for the day. Stick to these figures and use them first and foremost.

When you send that large quote, stay true to your convictions. If that’s what it will cost, based on your regular rate, then that’s what it will cost. Don’t pre-empt a no. Wait for it. If it doesn’t come, you just made a great sale. If it does, negotiate! If they don’t want to negotiate, you didn’t lose all that much, did you?

Hope That Helped

I hope this is useful to you. Maybe some of it, maybe all of it. If it helps the tiniest bit, then our whole industry is the better for it. Now go shoot something, and send me your reel!

UPDATE: There’s a companion post to this one, HOW A FREELANCER CAN GET WORK WITH THE X GENE. If you found this useful, check it out.

Simon J. Green is the owner of The X Gene and a producer of six years. Before The X Gene, he ran Green Rabbit, whose office in Docklands saw a regular rotation of camera operators he works with to this day. He’s produced TV shows, corporate videos, TVCs and every niche of video in between – always relying on camera ops to do the shooting.

Woman holding sign saying Don't Discount Journalism

Fairfax and the Truth About the Digital Future

By | Technology, Video Blogs | No Comments

The breaking news on our screens this morning is that Fairfax are dropping 1,900 jobs, closing the printing facilities in Chullora and Tullamarine, moving their print to tabloid format and erecting a paywall for their online sites. Our producer talks about the digital future, as seen through Fairfax’s crystal ball, and how it can help you.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-06-18/fairfax-cuts-jobs-goes-compact/4076732

The dot points, for those in a rush.

  • All media are adapting to digital. Fairfax is going through that painful transition.
  • The future of all media wil be smaller, niche, not as big – and there needs to be acceptance of that fact.
  • These changes had to happen. But workers can re-skill, or use their experience and expertise to set up their own new opportunities.
  • It’s a exciting time – wild west of the web.
  • Growing, understanding, will lead to, in my opinion, a more mum-and-pop approach to the entertainment and news we love and consume.
  • Fairfax workers, realise you have skills and knowledge. Find people you can work with and create your own visions.

ABC News: Who will survive the digital future?