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VideoViral Video

Three Types of Viral Video: 2. Funny Bone Activation

By March 17, 2012 2 Comments
Terry Tate office linbacker comedy viral memes

At The X Gene, we love researching video. One of the types we dissect is viral video. From our crazy experiments and field research, we’ve noticed there are three general categories of viral video. We try and direct our clients to these when discussing video productions, and now you can see what we’ve got to say.

The second is the Funny Bone Activation category.

UPDATE: If the President of the USA can be funny and make fat jokes, what are you really worried about with your brand?

(See also: 1. Did That Happen!? and 3. Sexy NSFW.)

Comedy has always been a fantastic loosener. It’s like a massage that relaxes your audience, making them happier to accept the messages you’re broadcasting. But it has to be funny. That’s bold-italics-underline because it’s the most important. Funny viral shouldn’t be considered lightly. If a video campaign tries to be funny and fails, you lose a whole lot of cool points and set your reputation positioning back to before you brainstormed the campaign. What’s the best way to make sure something is going to be funny? Hire writers and/or comedians. People who dedicate their lives to understanding humour (and need to in order to survive) have a far greater chance of getting the gums giggling. You can oversee the funny-makers, however, by ensuring you understand the audience you’re reaching, and what that audience finds funny.

A superbowl star for Reebok. Combining office humour and football = massive.

Styles of comedy vary from group to group. We at The X Gene love hearing a client’s profile of their brand, and who they want to reach. Sometimes that’s the group that already epitomise the brand; sometimes that’s a new group of people lured to the fold. The comedy stylings of ad campaigns run by, say, Lynx (Axe) Body spray are vastly different to that of Hewlett Packard. Understanding the brand, the audience, then trusting the right writers, comedians, actors, and director to employ the right style is crucial.

Rhys Darby, from Flight of the Conchords, boosted this internal campaign’s juice.

Often, due to the recognisable names in a comedy campaign, social network support is employed to make sure a lot of people notice the star and click through, share, make it easy. Manliest Rituals from Axe Body Spray utilised a customised tab on their Facebook page that acted as a mini-site, thus allowed people to watch the series in Facebook. Sharing was one click away. They also built a regular site, but in-app presence  is an increasingly necessary way to make your audience aware of the campaign you (and your writers) have put time and effort into.

A cruder humour for a teenage, frat boy audience is a lot of fun to make!

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